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  #11  
Old 04-10-2011, 08:56 PM
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lynnef lynnef is offline
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THIS is what you eat on long rides. Read the whole posting, comments and all.

Lynne "Fritos!" F

ps. and Starbucks Mocha Doubleshots!

Last edited by lynnef; 04-10-2011 at 09:04 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2011, 10:31 PM
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Interesting, somewhat helpful, amusing post (kent's bike blog, via link provided in lynnef's comment.) As for randonoeurring...in my dreams...or maybe my nightmares. I don't think I'm cut out to be pedaling that long on the bike. Some of the food suggestions in the comments to the aforementioned Kent's thread: "...anything from Little Debbies..." , "...Twinkies ..." ? What about all those preservatives? Maybe that's the 'secret performance ingredient'. Well gosh...I don't think so, not in my bod.

But I suppose if you're burning up enough calories, and you're in a tough spot to reconnoiter desperately needed nutrition, even roadkill would work, if it don't take too long to fix on the spot. If it's fresh, way to eliminate that problem, is to go for the livers and the kidneys right away...no cooking necessary. I've not actually ever done this, but I saw it depicted in a movie as a survival option, so of course, it must be true.

I did kind of like the idea of olives on the road. Hadn't thought about that. Also, the mention of mini-potatoes. I'd forgotten that I have carried a boiled potato when I rode. Sweet potato too. Works fairly good. It was funny having it my hand eating it in view of other cyclists. What in the heck are you eating!
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  #13  
Old 04-11-2011, 08:12 AM
boneshaker boneshaker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnef View Post
THIS is what you eat on long rides. Read the whole posting, comments and all.

Lynne "Fritos!" F

ps. and Starbucks Mocha Doubleshots!
That's a great article. I like what the guy says about eating whatever his stomach is asking for, but I'm not sure corndogs are going to make their way onto my plate anytime soon. For those rando riders they need a good mix though because you can't get along for days on end with just quick calories. I to have used boiled potato's, which have one of the highest GI's of any food, as do the fig bars. Boiled potato's in a jersey pocket can get messy, but they're yummy covered in salt on a long hot day...

edit: I wouldn't advocate pigging out on candy bars to refuel from a 50 mile ride though. These folks are doing 1000k brevets. My favorite re-fueling option is chocolate milk btw. Oh how I love chocolate milk...

Last edited by boneshaker; 04-11-2011 at 08:20 AM.
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  #14  
Old 04-11-2011, 08:24 AM
Alan Alan is online now
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JELL-O Instant Pistachio Pudding. Long story. Yes, great article, thanks Lynne! (Another vote for chocolate milk, too.)
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  #15  
Old 04-11-2011, 08:46 PM
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lynnef lynnef is offline
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(full disclosure: I am a randonneur. That said, my longest ride to date is 370km)

I eat a lot of that stuff. Snickers Dark Chocolate...mmmm. Those packets of nuts. The Trader Joes Sesame Crepe (1000 calories, 99 cents!). Not so much for the fried food. Avocados. Fig Bars. Hard Boiled Eggs. Bonbel cheeses. Bananas. But one does need to refuel, and you can only carry so much (ignore the article about Harriet Fell riding PBP with a roasted chicken in her handlebar bag)

That said, you can get a nice Greek yogurt in a grocery store, and, occasionally, our routes go through towns which support real grocery stores. Tasty protein. So yummy it ought to be dessert.

I am turning into a fan of ProBars - CranLemon Twister, 360 calories and not a single artificial ingredient. PaleyBars are good, too, but harder to find.

And not to forget the Rando Mocha - convenience store coffee with a packet of hot cocoa mix added.

My strategy is to front-load with proteins, and suck down carbs later in the day. This will change if I end up doing a ride which takes longer than 24 hours...
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  #16  
Old 04-12-2011, 01:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnef View Post
(full disclosure: I am a randonneur. That said, my longest ride to date is 370km)
Your modesty is noted with due awe. My disclaimer: my "marathon" experiences have been mostly backpacking.

Quote:
I eat a lot of that stuff. Snickers Dark Chocolate...mmmm. Those packets of nuts. The Trader Joes Sesame Crepe (1000 calories, 99 cents!). Not so much for the fried food. Avocados. Fig Bars. Hard Boiled Eggs. Bonbel cheeses. Bananas. But one does need to refuel, and you can only carry so much (ignore the article about Harriet Fell riding PBP with a roasted chicken in her handlebar bag)
What a great story from Harriet Fell! Very colorful history!

I'll give the Sesame Crepes a try. I love the little packs of sesame snap crackers in a caramel-like matrix (Asian food stores) but they definitely need lots of liquid chaser. I also want to try the SPAM musubi, from the comments on the Kent's Bike Blog article (another recipe here).

Summer sausage or salami and hard cheese last quite well unrefrigerated (a week) and have loads of fat that I crave when I'm burning muscles. If I sliced them and had them in a sturdy zip-lock (they ooze fat when warm) I could probably eat them on the fly, maybe with a chewy roll that I'd pre-spread with mayo and mustard.

That article and various accounts reminds me of those guys who sledged to the North Pole and their 8,000 cal/day diet where 5,000 of the calories were from pure fat, the most concentrated calories they could carry.

Quote:
That said, you can get a nice Greek yogurt in a grocery store, and, occasionally, our routes go through towns which support real grocery stores. Tasty protein. So yummy it ought to be dessert.
Thread veer: What is "Greek yogurt" and why is it suddenly all the rage? It came onto my radar sometime in the past year and seems just about the same as plain ol' Yoplait or Cascade Fresh to me. (insert culture joke here)

Quote:
I am turning into a fan of ProBars - CranLemon Twister, 360 calories and not a single artificial ingredient. PaleyBars are good, too, but harder to find.
I burned out badly on energy bars after living nearly entirely on them for a multi-day climb many, many years ago (Power Bar in particular). Overdose! I gradually recovered enough to accept Clif, Tiger's Milk and a Pemmican-type bar that REI used to carry, but only as supplements, not full daily diet. I don't recognize those that you mention but I'll keep an eye out and give them a try.

Down at PedalNation this past weekend Clif had some samples of new products which I'd eat if I were hungry enough, some bars and also some alternates to Gu that were like Gummi cubes and tasted quite nice.

Quote:
And not to forget the Rando Mocha - convenience store coffee with a packet of hot cocoa mix added.
Yeah, old favorite of mine, too, only with either instant coffee or tea-bag coffee. I haven't had the luxury (if you can call it that) of convenience stores, being out in the back-country.

Quote:
My strategy is to front-load with proteins, and suck down carbs later in the day. This will change if I end up doing a ride which takes longer than 24 hours...
I like some protein for breakfast, but then I try to get a steady stream of carbs going into me all day long. Not a lot at once, but nibbling several times an hour...GORP, hard candy, drink mix, etc. Lunch is a protein break, and sometimes it's hard to get moving again afterward.
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  #17  
Old 04-12-2011, 09:23 PM
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lynnef lynnef is offline
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Greek yogurt - a heavenly experience. I'll not go back to plain old thin watery yogurt again! Fage or Chobani brands are wonderful. My favorite work day late afternoon snack is plain nonfat Greek yogurt with fresh berries. I think this is a throwback to my Grandma's favorite snack of strawberries in sour cream.
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  #18  
Old 04-14-2011, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wsbob View Post
I'd forgotten that I have carried a boiled potato when I rode. Sweet potato too. Works fairly good. It was funny having it my hand eating it in view of other cyclists. What in the heck are you eating!
Should have told them you found it on the side of the road. lol
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  #19  
Old 04-19-2011, 07:04 PM
Alan Alan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnef View Post
Trader Joes Sesame Crepe (1000 calories, 99 cents!).
The TJs near me says they discontinued those after last summer.

I'll have to line up Greek yogurt side-by-side with my ordinary brands, see which I like better.
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  #20  
Old 05-02-2011, 03:17 PM
bikerinNE bikerinNE is offline
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Got your bike, bring a bike lock, always. That's my rule.
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