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  #11  
Old 04-05-2011, 10:25 AM
thumbprinterr thumbprinterr is offline
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i've read a couple of great non-fiction books recently by ted conover. one is called 'routes of man' which is about roads and their impact/significance on society, economics, politics, etc. the other is called 'newjack' which is a chronicle of the author spending a year as a corrections officer at a maximum security prison (sing sing). both were fascinating and well written. i've got another of his books on hold at the library, his story of spending a year as a hobo riding the rails....
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Old 04-05-2011, 11:15 AM
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"... one is called 'routes of man' which is about roads and their impact/significance on society, economics, politics, etc. ..." thumbprinter

Can't hurt to learn more that could help understand what's going on in that area.

I'm continuing to read the Sword of Truth series. A lot of escapist material in there, but plenty of good, deep, soul searching stuff too.

I've thought about your recommendation of the Count of Monte Christo. When I'm done with Goodkind, I might look into it. I have the tv on in the background a lot. One of the over the air stations loves to run certain movies into the ground. Man in the Iron Mask is one of them. In a number of ways, it's an interesting movie, visually beautiful...good portrayals, great locations...but as far as developing values and ideals that the characters talk about, the script is kind of thin.
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Old 04-25-2011, 11:42 PM
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I met an interesting person at the coffee shop. They, like thumbprinter, thought highly of The Count of Monte Christo. This last weekend, over the air tv station ION ran the 10yr old movie version of TCMC. I saw the last hour. It was quite good, so my interest in reading it grew in seeing the movie.

And now, for something a little closer to home...reading material helping acquaint ourselves with our real life natural surroundings amidst the highways and the byways... . I finally remembered to get around to spending time reading a book produced and published locally by the Tualitan Riverkeepers and Oregon State University Press. The book's title is 'Exploring the Tualatin River Basin'. .
This 162 pg, 5" by 8" hard finish paperback is quite a nifty little tome. What the writers have done, is focus on the Tualatin River Basin, ranging from out west of Forest Grove to just east of West Slope, north to the Tualatin Mtns (where Skyline Rd runs along.), and south to Sherwood. They've differentiated this encompassed area into 10 sections, each having between six and twelve viewing areas described with details about what's growing and living in each one.

Really, it's kind of a tour guide. Because all of the viewing areas are ones that have been encroached on by development and or roads, all of them could be visited by bike. Each viewing area has directions to get there from a major thoroughfare. What the book tells about is at once kind of sad, but also a victory of sorts. Through development, much of the areas natural environment has been lost...probably forever on a human human scale...but it demonstrates also, that what remains has been discovered and not so easily forgotten; known again and having hope of being appreciated by new generations of people.

Taking in the sites of the various viewing areas distinguished in the book can allow you to develop an understanding of how the seemingly nondescript, sometimes squalid looking (as in downtown Beaverton.) streams and creeks in the outlined area, collectively work together to help give our immediate natural environment the health and beauty we associate it with.
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Old 05-19-2013, 04:16 PM
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My better half picked up "Road to Valor: A True Story of WWII Italy, the Nazis, and the Cyclist Who Inspired a Nation" by Aili and Andres McConnon.

Road to Valor is the inspiring, against-the-odds story of Gino Bartali, the cyclist who made the greatest comeback in Tour de France history and secretly aided the Italian resistance during World War II.

Gino Bartali is best known as an Italian cycling legend: the man who not only won the Tour de France twice, but also holds the record for the longest time span between victories. During the ten years that separated his hard-won triumphs, his actions, both on and off the racecourse, ensured him a permanent place in Italian hearts and minds.

I started reading it and it's pretty interesting.
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