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  #1  
Old 11-17-2008, 04:26 PM
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K'Tesh K'Tesh is offline
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Question Ok... Books...

Any suggestions on what to read?

Besides Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance?

Your book report is due...
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Old 11-17-2008, 04:50 PM
scholzj scholzj is offline
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I am 3/4 of the way through an excelent book called Catfish and Mandala. It is by Andrew X. Pham, I think that he is a local author since the cover says he lives here in Portland. Great book about the authors trip to his homeland of vietnam on a bicycle.

Last edited by scholzj; 11-18-2008 at 10:41 AM.
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Old 11-17-2008, 06:03 PM
bikerinNE bikerinNE is offline
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Default Books

An excellent read is a book by Barbra Savage called “Miles from Nowhere: A Round the World Bicycle Adventure.” I couldn’t put it down. Barbra Savage was killed in a bicycle accident shortly before she was able to publish the book. Her husband published it for her.

Another great read is, “The Immortal Class” by Travis Culley. It’s not a book just about bicycle messengers, but about living a life with a bicycle as your own source of travel, and co-existing with the automobile. Another terrific read.

Another book, written by a local author, and a book of short stories called, “Metal Cowboy,” by Joe kurmaskie. It’s a book of short stories written around his adventures on a bicycle.
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Old 11-17-2008, 06:11 PM
bikerinNE bikerinNE is offline
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"Chasing Lance: The 2005 Tour De France and Lance Armstrong's Ride of a Lifetime" by Martin Dugard. I read it, it's a good book, but I liked it for the inside look of the behind-the-scenes style of the tour. The stories of what happens inside the media, from town to town during the tour.
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:19 PM
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Second on Miles from Nowhere and Metal Cowboy. The Barbara Savage belongs in every well-read bicyclist's library. Seriously.

It's a bit strident and long winded, but Effective Cycling by John Forester is worth reading, if not owning. Even if you don't agree with him, you owe him and all the rest of us the favor of listening to his arguments.

Also, a very strange and hair-raising book currently available at Powells: Urban Bikers' Tricks & Tips by Dave Glowacz. Disturbing but has a lot of...interesting information.

--jason "never skitched, never will" p.
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  #6  
Old 11-18-2008, 10:38 AM
scholzj scholzj is offline
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If you liked Metal Cowboy check his latest book Momentum is your Friend. Great read. Oh and I third Miles from nowhere. I too could not put it down.
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  #7  
Old 11-18-2008, 02:38 PM
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+1 on Miles from Nowhere.
Wheels North
Anything by Joe Kurmaskie
the first Lance Armstrong book (Its Not About the Bicycle, I think)
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  #8  
Old 11-18-2008, 02:55 PM
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Default Good Bike Books

I'll add my vote for Effective Cycling by John Forester. Yes, It can be a bit pedantic. But there's a ton of practical information in there as well, from how to ride in traffic or be an effective advocate, to how to do maintenance and repair, or what gear inches are and why they matter. If there's a bicycling textbook, this is it.

Ten Points by Bill Strickland is also a great book. I usually stay away from confessional-type non fiction, but his story of amateur racing and coming to terms with his abusive father was very moving and inspirational.

Speaking of racing, The Ride by Tim Crabbe should be at the top of any cyclist's reading list if you have even a passing interest in what makes bike racers tick. A true classic.

I also really like Bicycle! A Repair and Maintenance Manifesto by Sam Tracy. It may not be the most detailed bike repair manual, but the combination of edginess and sly humor, mixed throughout with a clear love for the machine, makes this a great read.

And while not technically a book, Sheldon Brown's website is packed with at least as much information as any bike book could be; the only difference is that it's not between 2 covers.
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Old 11-18-2008, 03:06 PM
mtmann mtmann is offline
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Default Good Bike Books

I'll add my vote for Effective Cycling by John Forester. Yes, It can be a bit pedantic. But there's a ton of practical information in there as well, from how to ride in traffic or be an effective advocate, to how to do maintenance and repair, or what gear inches are and why they matter. If there's a bicycling textbook, this is it.

Ten Points by Bill Strickland is also a great book. I usually stay away from confessional-type non fiction, but his story of amateur racing and coming to terms with his abusive father was very moving and inspirational.

Speaking of racing, The Ride by Tim Crabbe should be at the top of any cyclist's reading list if you have even a passing interest in what makes bike racers tick. A true classic.

I also really like Bicycle! A Repair and Maintenance Manifesto by Sam Tracy. It may not be the most detailed bike repair manual, but the combination of edginess and sly humor, mixed throughout with a clear love for the machine, makes this a great read.

And while not technically a book, Sheldon Brown's website is packed with at least as much information as any bike book could be; the only difference is that it's not between 2 covers.
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  #10  
Old 11-25-2008, 05:25 PM
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the Travis Culley book is a good read, Immortal Class or something
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